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, that's me. don't give money to beggars like me. governments must spend more. >> medicare, medicaid, social security. john: this government really helps the poor. >> everybody in cleveland. >> by any measurement this is not working. john: i am glad more people figure that out. >> commerce, entrepreneurial capitalism takes more people out of poverty. john: even some in the mainstream media. >> if you're waiting for the government you're going to be in for an awful long way. john: if they get it may be seen more people will realize there are better ways to give. real charity. that is our show tonight. ♪ >> and now. ♪ john: what is real charity? people are in trouble after a disaster or simply when people are poor. americans instead is to think amount and government help. after all, who will help those people is not government? libertarians argue that private charity would step in. individuals really choosing to help. but with enough of us up? most people say no. that is why liberals like newsday columnist say when it comes to helping the need, that is mostly government's job. >> w
this man? >> thank you. >> actually that's me. don't give money to beggars like me. i'm told governments must spend more. >> medicare, medicaid, snap and social security will reduce poverty. >> but does government really help the poor? >> everybody in cleveland low minority got obama phones! >> by any measurement, this isn't working! >> i'm glad more people have figured that out. even the singer, bono. >> commerce, entrepreneurial capitalism takes more people out of poverty. >> even some in the mainstream media. >> if you wait until the government comes in, you'll be in for a long wait. >> wow. if they get it, maybe soon more people will realize there are better ways to give. >> beautiful. >> real charity. that's our show tonight. >> and now, john stossel. >> what is real charity? some people are in trouble, say after a disaster, or simply when people are poor, americans' instinct is to think, how can government help? after all, who will help those people if not government? we libertarians argue private charity would step in, individuals freely choosing to help. but what enough of us hel
's be honest. we eavesdrop, too. everyone is listening to everyone else. he went on to add, "we don't have the same means as the united states which makes us jealous." america spends tens of billions of dollars on intelligence collection. it's hard to get data to make good comparisons but it is safe to assume that washington's intelligence budget dwarfs that of other countries just as it does with defense spending. it is particularly strange that this rift should develop between the united states and its closest allies in europe. it was predictable and in fact in a sense predicted. in 2002, the british diplomat robert cooper wrote an essay in which he argued that europe was a post-modern international system in which force was no longer a serious option. instead, economic interdependence and cooperation were the governing ideas of state craft. and certainly when one looks at the european union, it does describe its reality. the prospect of war between france and germany which had gone to war three times between 1870 and 1950 seems utterly impossible. but outside of europe, the world is not
can't be the leader of it? >> i don't think it -- i don't think an independent candidate can possibly win a three-way race. if you think about it. you run a three-way race and translate to a morality of the electorial college vote. get to the house where each state gets one vote and republicans have 30 odd delegations. it's a virtual yule impossibility for the presidency. what i wish that americans elect would do is say instead of trying to get candidates to run or path and run for a job that is impossible for them to win is encourage independent candidates. people who are ceo or university presidents, community leaders to run as independents for the house and for the senate. >> yeah. >> there is nothing wrong with the senate that three or four legitimately independent senators could fix. it could go a long way. there's a structure barrier on the presidential side. there simply can't be -- >> you agree. >> that was sort of -- trying to finish my thought. that's what i'm shocked at. what where the 2014 candidates? it would be so easy -- i look at my home state of florida and w
analysis and extra and don't forget instagram and if you missed any part of today's show, sear go to itunes and search state of the union. >> this is "gps." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. we have great show for you today. we'll start with nsa spying and uproar it caused in europe especially. germany's former defense minister will explain what is going on there. and then the former nsa director will help us understand what america's spies are really doing around the world and michael bloomberg called the mayor of the world. with the election of his successor on hand, what lessons does bloomberg have to share with us? one of them, cities need rich people. he'll explain. and the latest weapon against bad guys. it's not a new fangled drone or bunker buster bomb. it's simply brittany. i'll explain. revelations about the national security agency and spying on foreign allied leaders has been embarrassing for the obama administration at a time when it hardly needs more bad news. is it more than an embarrassment? should it raise alarms abroad and at home?
. that. >> they don't step in because the government is there. they say government does that. >> i think the reality is in real life all of these private efforts are really important. we are generous people. we give a lot of money. when the chips are down the big thing happens when the typhoon hits the philippines they don't have an aircraft carrier with marines on board and rescue helicopters. the u.n. military dol tear -- u military does. i want them there when the typhoon hits. >> i don't know what's going to happen in the philippines. we promised billions of dollars but a billion hasn't gotten there. they were going to build 15,000 homes fewer than 3,000. >> if you argue government sometimes doesn't do a perfect job. >> usually, always. >> i want to show a clip of a disaster face based charities were better than fema and then there's the wait, this is brian will am yeahs talking about the tornado in moore, oklahoma in may and 30 churches banned together and did it more quickly than the government. they were turning away people trying to get water. they were sending the water to the w
to put my turkey in a thing in the yard. >> a deep fryer. >> i don't think i want that. but they've talked me into it. i had to buy a special size and i'm fearing someone is going to get hurt. >> he's trolling mika. >> is that very bad for you? >> it macs the turkey come alive. >> in peanut oil. >> why don't you eat some fourteench fries in. >> i have been talked into it. i have to bring the turkey over at 1:00. he's going to take care of it and give it back to me. >> it will taste good. >> it will? ion if my parents will like that. that's what's happening. none of are you cooking. are any of you shopping on friday? i don't understand this black friday thing. all right. i would suggest others don't as well. right? >> it can wait until saturday. >> go online or save your money. >> go online. >> okay. so we're all getting ready for the holiday. it's one of the busiest travel days of the year. of course, on coup, the amount of storm system is threatening to spoil the thanksgiving holiday. is that possible? today most of the northeast and mid-atlantic are expected to be pummelled wit
analyst and another rhino, charles krauhammer. i don't think you're a trader like me but you're a rhino and you know it, don't you? >> i'm a rhino in name only, which means i'm in a new category. we're going to call ourselves hip hippos. >> hippos stands for? >> i don't know. i just made that up. >> hippos. hypocrisy. >> it has all of the letters that you want. i think this whole thing is as you say very much blown up by the liberal media because it's a great traumatic story. here's the fundamental contradiction. i think this analysis is wrong. it's fundamentally wrong for this reason. the difference between what are being called a hard right and the moderates, the rhinos and the true believers is really one over tactics rather than over ideology and objectives. let me give you one example. is there a disagreement -- fundamental disagreement between one faction and another over paul ryan's radical reform of medicare. i would say no. what we're talking about is whether it was a good idea to shut down the government. whether it's a good idea to adopt a tactic here, tactic there. on object
look, here's the bottom line. i don't want to rely to which on the polls. when you look at the cbs poll where 43% say repeal the thing outright, they know there's not a majority for that right now and that the republicans are going to keep pushing to defund it, repeal it, et cetera. i think more worrisome is that the cbs poll says change this law. the president tried to stall and buy more time by doing this executive fix. it's not really clear that he has executive power to delay these cancellation notices by one year. he's got the state insurance commissioners here at the white house trying to convince them to go along with this plan but you know full well it's not just republicans any more on the hill, there are some moderate democrats as well in the senate, in the house, demanding changes to this law. to answer your question what's going to happen, i still don't think the law is going to be repealed so it's not going to be fully implemented as you asked, but are there going to be real substantive changes to this law? i think that's becoming more and more likely when you have this dem
identity out of fear of retaliation. >> if they have someone they don't like, they target him. they set up a couple of formations in a false place for that individual and they make the plan that that individual is going to show up there. and when they don't show up in the right place they're going to write them up. they'll see a soldier that is on edge, they'll push them to get them to lash out. >> a lot of these service personnel are being pushed out without any unemployment insurance, without benefits of any kind, access to the g.i. bill, any kind of support. what happens to them? >> the majority are homeless. if they don't have a family to go home to. i've seen soldiers actually taken out to the front gate with all their possessions and sat down. they don't have a car. they don't have a family. so they're out there with a flat screen tv sitting in the grass. >> in july, andrew long was charged from the air force losing access to benefits like the g.i. bill and unemployment insurance. his discharge form cites misconduct and drug abuse. >> there was no drug abuse found. i never came up ho
have nuclear weapons. and i don't want to see that happen in iran. >> senator cardin, your reaction to the deal and to the reservations you just heard from senator corker. >> chris, first, it's clear to i think everyone but for the u.s. leadership and tough series of sanctions that were imposed by congress we would have never gotten serious negotiations in iran. we are very concerned whether iran will live up to these commitments. during the next six months we expect there will be negotiations to eliminate the infrastructure in iran that would be able to produce a nuclear weapon. congress needs to be prepared, as the administration has said, to make sure that this interim step is enforced, that there is no deviation whatsoever. and during this period of time there is a border agreement reached -- broader agreement reached with iran that eliminates their ability to produce a nuclear weapon. the sanctions that have been released can be reimposed at any time. congress will want to make it clear that if iran does not live up to these commitments we will not only insist that the sanction
a religious freedom claim, then what's to keep any company from saying we don't want to serve jews, we don't want to hire gays. >> that's the slippery slope here. >> that's what the supreme court has to be very concerned about. >> so the question here, is can a corporation hold constitutionally protected religious beliefs. what if the west borrow baptist church started a greeting card company and decided not to give -- effectively decide if a company can pick and choose which laws it will follow, based on the personal religious beliefings of its owners. >> joining us now is justice correspondent pete williams, and pete, why did this case come before the court. there's a split at the lower federal court level about whether or not these parties have a claim. >> that's right, the hobby lobby won its case in the fifth circuit court of appeals in denver. the constitution does give personal rights to corporations, the supreme court has given a number of them over the years, including most recently, freedom of speech rights. the third circuit court of appeals t other one the supreme court agreed
goes on the record riling now. >>> healthcare.gov strikes again. >> obama care was a mistake. i don't think obama care has failed. >> the more we hear about the technical problems concerning the website, the more it looks as if it's going to take quite a while and this website will never be quite right. >> we don't care if the website gets up and running, it's just going to prove to be an invitation to find out more problems as to obama care as a whole. >> the next ticking time bomb, increased costs for anyone who gets their health insurance through their employer. >> small business plans are being just denied an cancelled. >> the real problem with obama care is not that the website isn't working, it's frankly that the affordable care act is working just as it was designed. >> the rollout itself and a malfunctioning website isn't the problem, obama care itself is the problem. >> we're seeing costs go up, we're seeing millions of americans lose the insurance that they like. >> hello, everyone, i'm dana perino. the obama care deadline to fix healthcare.gov, it will operate much better
, republicans don't have an alternative or they don't seem like they have a solution to all these problems. those numbers could turn back around again. martha: that's a great point. you look at this as you get further down the road and people will start to weave their way down the program. and no doubt there will be people who say, yeah, through, i got understand. the sky didn't fall on me. and this issue may sort of move again as you are referencing. so what do you think republicans need to do if they want to continue to see the numbers they are seeing in this poll? >> they could do nothing. that is an argument some republicans and consequence are using. the employer mandate will be implemented starting the beginning of 2015. so by the time the 2014 elections are rolling around. all those letters in the individual market will be flowing in to people in the employer market which is much more vast than the individual market. but i think republicans ought to be thinking about what kind of changes they would bring to the table, to the healthcare system. nobody likes their insurance company ev
.m. you don't want to miss it. >> we will see you back here tomorrow night. >>> healthcare.gov strikes again. >> i don't think obama care is failing. access has been a failure a this point in time. >> the more it looks as if it's going to take quite a while. this website may never be quite right. >> it needs to be fixed. >> the next ticking time bomb. increased costs for anyone that gets health care through their employer. >> the real problem with obama care is not that the website isn't working. it's frankly that the affordable care act is working just as it was designed. >> the roll out and a malfunctioning website isn't the problem. obama care, itself, is the problem. >> we're seeing costs go up. we're seeing millions of americans lose the insurance that they like. >> hello, everyone, i'm dana perino. the obama care deadline to fix healthcare.gov, it will operate much better than it did in october. much better. that's it? former senior adviser to president reagan joins us. sir, what do you think is going to happen on november 30th? is this going to be another missed deadline for hea
to office to look you in the eye and tell you the truth even if you don't like the truth being told. that's the jersey way. i know in my heart that what is going to happen tomorrow night is going to send a message not only to everyone in new jersey. tomorrow night america is going to be watching new jersey. >> he calls himself a conservative. most of us see him as a moderate, most analysts do. is that the difference between him and cuccinelli, does the moderate winning of the republican party gain some new traction today? >> i think just a little bit. but if you're talking about christie for president in 2016, i still think it's a huge long shot for obvious reasons. namely when you get him to the primary season for the republicans, he's going to seem way, way, way too liberal particularly on social issues for a lot of folks. he is a pretty unique character. just listening to that just now sort of thinking i'm listening to tony soprano. brash, catholic, tough guy, he has the vibrato which has played very well and comes interestingly against the backdrop of the state with very high taxes an
obama is optimistic. >> we don't have to trust them. what we have to do is make sure that there is a good deal in place from the perspective of us verifying what they're doing, we can test it. >> for more i'm johnny damon by trita parsi, the president of the national iranian american council and here in new york is nathan carlson, served with the george w. bush administration, of the group iran. john kerry's trip to geneva, and are sergesergey lavrov is joinie group. do we have a deal? >> we are 90% chance of a deal. particularly folks who got us into iraq complaining about obama doing something that could be problematic, i feel it difficult to believe to be completely frank with you. it's not about trust as the president said. what you have to do is create a deal in which the mechanism for verification is such that you can trust the verification system, so that you know that if the other side is cheating you can catch them at a very early stage. if this deal in its second phase causes the iranian thes to implement the additional protocol then we have the best and mos
served on this veterans day. we don't have a lot of time. we have wonderful responses. i'll leave you with simply steven crawford. just say thank you. "morning joe" starts right now. >>> good morning, everyone. it is monday, november 11th. welcome to "morning joe." with us onset we have msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halperin. how is it going? >> good morning. >> double down. >> and national affairs editor msnb chris political analyst john heileman. they're co-authors of "double down." we're going to begin on a somber note. the absolute devastation from a super typhoon in the philippines. overnight the first u.s. relief flight loaded with water and generators arrived in one of the harder hit areas. marines and sailors are also helping with the search and rescue operations. up to 10,000 people are feared dead in one province alone after one of the strongest storms on record. itv's angus walker has more. >> reporter: this amateur video obtained by filipino broadcaster abscbn shows the moment of impact. a wall of water 20 feet high by some accounts crashing into
'm going to say you know, i don't know. do you know? >> i kind of think that's where this whole distraction idea came from. this is utterly amazing. but it also shows how desperate the right wing is, to develop any kind of narrative they can in the media, so people will pick it up and say, yeah, this iranian thing is all about obama care. i mean, it's outrageous. give me a break. obama care, i know it doesn't show it in the polls right now, but i think that the people are a little bit behind this one. obama care has been on a roll over the last couple weeks. nobody wants to report it. the federal exchange is working better on a day-to-day basis. day after day, it's getting better. the state exchanges are booming. the 14th state-based exchanges, oh-oh, bad news here. doubled enrollment in the first half of the month of november, jumping from 79,000 to 150,000 in just 14 days. how in the heck did they do that? let's face it. if that trend keeps up, representatives can say goodbye to their bogus talking points. look, meanwhile, there is another major reason republicans are really trashing this
to do this for people and the president. i don't know why anyone would site is. at least try and help with it. instead of siding with the corporations who want to have all the edge on the security -- on the insurance companies. thank you and god bless the people. from here's kathy montgomery, texas on our republican line. caller: i have been watching yhis president obama trey slithered his way out of this. you can keep your 26-year-old on your parents plan. actually, he's going to get rid of that. next year when our employers kick us off of their plan because obama wants it this way, no one is going to be on insurance. no one's going to have insurance. he is try to push us little by little onto socialized medicine that doesn't work. our family lives in europe. it doesn't work. my nephews can't get simple surgeries that they need. it is always delayed because the government doesn't know how to run things. my advice to people who are getting kicked off the plan, pay the fine until president obama is out of office and i pray to god that our government can get together and fix this mess.
been secret facilities. that's why we don't take anything at face value. >> reporter: this deal is a confidence building measure. it buys time to broker a more complete agreement that addresses things like destroying all of iran's nuclear fuel and giving access to all of either facilities. basically the hard part is just beginning. >> margaret, thank you. >>> eric cantor is the man responsible for bringing any additional sanctions to a vote in the house. he calls this deal a mistake. congressman cantor is in rich mopp mond, virginia. congressman, good morning. >> good morning. >> you heard the secretary of state say this is good because it expands the time that iran will have capacity to make a nuclear weapon, there is more inspection and some restriction 20% will have to be changed. why isn't that a good deal to freeze things and delay? >> charlie, i think this deal, this interim deal with iran, is in fact dangerous. it is a deal which brings iran closer to becoming a nuclear power. this deal that has been negotiated by the secretary of state frankly falls well short of the u.n
don't sacrifice sovereignty. we don't change in the american loss to advance our interests and we advance our brand and value system. i thank you for giving me an opportunity to share those thoughts with you. >> thank you. senator flake. >> thank you. if i could follow-up with regard to the case the supreme court is currently hearing, on the versus u.s. mr. thornburgh, were you surprised when you heard the federal government was actually suing -- or using treaty or convention in order to bring charges against an individual, a chemical weapons treaty? were you surprised this was used in this fashion? >> yes. >> if you're surprised by that, what can reassure us that you won't be surprised that this treaty is used for similar purpose? >> i think by that time the supreme court would've thrown out data, the basis for it. >> but the fact it even brought and it's survived one challenge, gone up one level as well. >> let me mention that it's sad to say the department justice doesn't always act wisely. and that there are occasions when mistakes are made in the pursuing of cases and controv
was up lobbying all of us in congress saying hey, whatever you do, don't move forward on sanctions. i think we'll have a great deal coming up here. candidly they laid sanctions on the table it allowed iran to craft an agreement where they walked away saying the world has recognized us as a nuclear power. that's a huge problem. that is exactly what we were trying to avoid. >> rose: we conclude this evening with an analysis of the agreement with gary seymour, david sanger, ray tacka and gary sick. >> the reason why the iranians are seeking a deal is because the economic pressure of sanctions. and the big question as david said does this taste of sanctions relief make further nuclear concessions more likely or do-- does this modest relief of sanctions make them more able to withstand the status quo and therefore less likely to make nuclear concession. in sex months we'll have a better idea which is correct. >> a analysis of the nuclear agreement with iran. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following:. >> rose: and american express. additional funding provided by these funde
and the 5 million internally displaced syrians who don't have a place to live or enough to eat. as the crisis has escalated, we have accelerated our humanitarian response. our assistance is now reaching about 4.2 million people inside syria and we're helping to support 2 million refugees. but the same stubborn challenges that i talked about seven months ago, access, security and resources continue to prevent us and others from reaching everybody who needs help to get it and things continue to escalate. in early october, fueled by the political momentum of the security council's resolution to eliminate the chemical weapons, the u.n. security council unanimously passed a presidential statement on humanitarian access. this statement urges all parties to the conflict to facilitate immediate access to all those affected including going across borders and across conflict lines. this agreement represents the first and the most significant show of global political will to help those who need it most, and the challenge now is to translate that commitment into real action on the ground.
are scavenging for food among the debris. they don't have shelter. imagine what it must be like to be here at night-time. it's difficult to pick your way through the debris in the day. at night-time it's black. there's absolutely no light whatsoever. and now it's raining. tonight is going to be an extremely miserable time for the survivors who are still out there and who help, hep hasn't shelter. >> the other horror and health hazard - we see it in the pictures - bodies are strewn everywhere. nobody can move them at this point, because they are more concerned with survivors. >> of course. it's important for us to deal with those that have survived and ensure that they survive in the coming days, weeks, months. and to come and immediately they need food, clean water, they need shelter and medical supplies, and aid agencies such as save the children prioritise the survivors to ensure they are well taken care of, children can recover. no child should have to go through a catastrophic disaster such as this one. >> i wish you the best in your there. >> thank you for joining us tonight and givin
shares her story. >> the affordable healthcare act means that i have a chance, that i don't have to stop treatment >> wooduff: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> my customers can shop around; see who does good work and compare costs. it can also work that way with healthcare. with united healthcare, i get information on quality ratings of doctors, treatment options and estimates for how much i'll pay. that helps me and my guys make informed decisions. i don't like guesses with my business and definitely not with our health. that's health in numbers. united healthcare. >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: six days of misery
why republicans see the hypocrisy? i don't have a clip -- good to i don't have a clip because you weren't in the senate. can you understand why republicans say this is hypocritical, democrats were against this tooth and nail in 2005? >> i can understand it but the reality is it has been an unprecedented level of obstruction. i mean, in 2005, they reached a compromise. they put judges on the court. here, we have just hit a wall. there was no compromise, they said they weren't going to fill them, they had a bill to abolish the vacancies on the court. this is probably the most important court in the nation except for the supreme court, handling all the administrative rulings, regulatory rulings, major issues that the administration puts out there. so this, we reached this unprecedented level of obstruction and so we had to break through this. but i think this is returning to the constitution. the constitution has super majorities in five places, not on advice and consent. that's what we're supposed to do on judges, that's what we're supposed to do on executive -- >> the constitution
no illusions. you don't do this on the basis of somebody's statements to you. you do it on the basis of actions that can be verified and more over we have kept the basic architecture of the sanctions is staying in place. there is very little relief. and we are convinced that over the next few months we will really be able to put to the test what iran's intentions are. >> so you at this point trust the new president in iran to be able to follow-through. are you convinced that he has the power to do so? because you know that the hard-liners in iran certainly are singing a different tune than has been sung at the negotiating table. >> absolutely. the simple answer is none of this is based on trust. it's not a question of trust. it's a question of having the verification and the intrusive inspections and the insights into the program and the commitments that can be held accountable so that you are, in fact, creating a fail-safe mechanism by which you are making your judgments. when you're dealing with nuclear weapons, it's not an issue of trust. as the old saying goes if gorbachev and reagan, you k
program, that there have been secret why facilities. that's why we don't take anythig at face value. >> reporter: this deal is a a confidence building measure.uilding it buys time to broker a more complete agreement that addresses things like destroyingtroying all of iran's nuclear fuel and and giving access to all facilities. basically the hard part is just beginning. >> margaret, thank you.u. house republican leader eric sponsible cantor the man for bringing additional sanctions in the the e. house calls this a mistake. he's in richmond virginia. we have a conversation you'll see only on "cbs this morning." good morning. >> charlie, good morning. >> you heard the secretary of state say this is good because it expands the time iran has the have capaci capacity to make a nuclear weapon.e there's more inspection and some enrichment is to 20% will have to be changed.o why isn't that a good deal to why freeze things and delay? charli >> charlie, i think this deal im with iran is in fact dangerous. it is a deal which brings iran closer to becoming a nuclear nego power.
in this century. which more important we don't see that in the international community, to put its efforts. we still see actions the international community dealing as a business rather than focusing on finding an end to the conflict in syria. >> president assad's force versus gained ground against the rebels. what is the significance of that? >> it's two steps forward and one step back for this regime. it's not moving. it's not going anywhere. it has essentially license to slaughter it's own people as long as it doesn't use the chemical weapons. i would agree that this is a humanitarian catastrophe. you have 100,000 dead. if we don't take up. >> apparently the assad regime has agreed to give up it's chemical weapons so it won't be able to slaughter its people with chemical weapons. we see increased weapons but not enough to overthrow the regime or oh depend themselves. you need to have a game changer, hopefully it comes at the peace table. unless you marry diplomacy, another 100,000 will be dead by going into next year. >> what was the general perception when the u.s. stepped forward and said
of the house because the water is really coming in. i have three kids. i don't know what to do. then we go to the house of my mother. >> as the people walk they pass bodies on the side of the road. in places the stench is unbearable. removing the bodies is a slow process. those that have been collected are taken to a makeshift morgue, where local officials attempt to identify them. after which they are taken to moss graves. >> -- mass graves. it is early day, but what we are seeing there's little recovery effort going on. clearly there's not enough food and water, and there doesn't appear to be anyone picking through the rubble looking for the missing. at the moment people seem to be in survival mode. many challenges lie ahead for the city and its people. while there's security, looting is a problem. here the remains of a supermarket were picked through and taken away. small teams of medics are doing the best they can to treat basic wounds suffered during the storm. with so many bodies and no sanitation, other problems may arise. we don't have water. then, also, there is fever, and... >> t
is collapsing. now, do you think i'm coming on too strong with this? >> oh, no, i don't. i think you're absolutely right and this is something we knew would happen when the big day came, you know, october 1st for this rollout. we knew there were problems and we felt for a long time it would collapse under its own weight. stuart: congressman, we thank you for joining us, it's going to be a busy day for you, sir, and appreciate you being with us. >> glad to be with you. stuart: the president stated many times how helpful obamacare would be to small business and said it on the website. quoting directly, the affordable care act makes it easier for businesses to build on the marketplace. and stops insurance companies from taking advantage of you. oh, let's bring in mary kissel on the wall street journal editorial board and show has numbers for us about the responses from small business to this ad for obamacare. >> good morning, stuart. we had an editorial in the paper this morning that talks about a public opinion strategy survey of about 400 business owners. and these are small business
was surrounded by bodies. decaying bodies. i don't know how i have survived. >> reporter: it's called bliss, the name of a housing project built for people who'd lost their homes in past typhoons. this time, it was no safe haven. >> bliss is made up of a maze of narrow alleyways, and when the typhoon struck, they filled with water within seconds to above- roof height. and yet most survived, quickly climbing high enough to escape, clearly still happy to be alive. but living is hard-- long queues for empty shelves, medicines are rationed. so, as evening approaches, barricades are manned, warnings to looters. the army patrols while the people of tacloban fend for themselves. >> woodruff: john sparks of independent television news joined anxious ferry passengers travelling to another hard-hit area today. their five-hour journey began in cebu city. >> reporter: there wasn't much interest today in the boat to ormoc city, although several dozen climbed on board with bundles of food or clothing. they weren't commuters or traders, and this wasn't a routine trip. for many, the 11:45 ferry was a voyag
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